Archives for posts with tag: Dr Ramin Shayan

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I wish I had taken some notes is all I can say, but I was so mesmerised by Dr Ramin Shayan of the University of Melbourne, Australia that I just sat and listened.  So I’ll have to rely on what impacted me most to pass onto you.

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Dr Ramin Shayan

First of all I have to mention Dr Shayan’s humility – he addressed the Plenary Session of the Conference on the last day and started out by saying how much more we all knew than him and he was in awe of being in a room of so many therapists with so much knowledge. Well, you could hear a pin drop – we’re used to being ignored in the medical world so having a surgeon commend us was a big thing.  He added that he’s usually stuck as the last speaker at medical conferences after many delegates had already left and those who were still there were almost asleep. Turns out that lymphoedema/lipoedema is ignored no matter what level of medical training you have.  Isn’t that a really sad indication of our healthcare system?

Dr Shayan talked about the surgery he is doing with lymphoedema and lipoedema, in particular lympho-venous stenosis – attaching a lymphatic capillary to a vein to bypass the damaged area.  They are having excellent success with this procedure.

He also specialises in liposuction and debulking for lymphoedema and lipoedema so if you are considering surgical treatment, I can full recommend him as a caring, knowledgeable surgeon who understands the lymphatic system to a microscopic detail.

Dr Shayan was also present at the second Lipoedema Conference held last weekend  in Melbourne and was interviewed by The Project for their package on lipoedema which aired this week on Channel 10.  Watch it here.

 

http://ntpages.com.au/lisahiggins

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I’ve just returned from the 11th Australasian Lymphology Association Conference, held in Darwin from 26-28 May, 2016.  These conferences are filled with information on the latest research which is always interesting and a bit mind-boggling at times.  I was very excited that this year there was a real focus on Lipoedema, a condition I am passionate about.  I’ll try and set out as much useable information as I can from two speakers in particular – Dr Ramin Shayan from the University of Melbourne, Australia and Associate Professor Karen Herbst from the University of Arizona, USA.  In this post I’ll focus on Dr Herbst.

Firstly, according to Dr Herbst, a few of the symptoms of lipoedema (for more information click here):

  • fatty enlargement of limbs (firstly legs, arms can develop later)
  • pain
  • predominantly women affected, if men then they have low testosterone or liver disease
  • bilateral and symmetric
  • sluggish lymph
  • can have pitting oedema
  • vascular fragility and bruising
  • varicose veins
  • persistent enlargement of limb even after elevation
  • calorie restriction doesn’t affect size of limbs
  • swelling increases with heat
  • disproportion between upper and lower body
  • feet not involved in early stages
  • hyper mobility
  • low tissue resistance
  • hypothermia of skin

There are different stages:

  • Stage 1 – skin still smooth but texture feels different
  • Stage 2 – skin is lumpy and nodular
  • Stage 3 – lymphoedema is also present

Nodules can be felt in all stages and the good news is that not everyone progresses through all stages.

There are different types:

  • Type 1 – buttocks and hips
  • Type 2 – waist to knees
  • Type 3 – waist to ankles
  • Type 4 – arms only
  • Type 5 – lower extremity only

The abdomen is involved as well as the area above the pubic area.

OK.  So here’s the helpful information, now that you have an idea of what’s involved symptom wise.

  • healthy, anti-inflammatory diet (high fat, high protein and low processed carbohydrates)
  • movement (whatever doesn’t cause a flare up of symptoms, water based activities seem to work best)
  • manual lymphatic drainage (find a practitioner here)
  • bandaging (if lymphoedema or fibrosis is also present)
  • compression (20-30 mmHg)
  • pumps (if you react well to manual lymphatic drainage generally, make sure there is an abdominal piece)
  • medications – work with your GP

Dr Herbst has found that amphetamines are helpful (these are more available in the US, basically diet pills).  You would need to consult with your doctor to find out more.

She also recommends Butcher’s Broom as it helps to increase lymphatic pumping and helps prevent venous insufficiency.

Here are the BIG yet surprisingly simple things you can do for yourself:

  • intermittent fasting. This helps get natural amphetamines into the body. She recommends a 20 hour fast – water and herbal teas during the day and normal dinner.  For more information she recommended the regimen by Dr Jason Fung.  There is a book available but I can only find the Kindle edition at the moment
  • selenium – it inhibits inflammation and decreases oedema. Her recommendation is to get that from eating three Brazil nuts a day! You couldn’t get much easier than that.  She suggests starting with one nut and increasing to three
  • lemon – half a lemon squeezed into water daily
  • avoid MSG

Dr Herbst recommended the book Lymphedema and Lipedema Nutrition Guide – I could only find a Kindle edition on Amazon but you may find it in your bookstore.

http://ntpages.com.au/lisahiggins

I can’t tell you how impressed, excited and amazed I am with the wonderful ladies of the Lipoedema Australia Support Society (LASS).  They have once again crossed boundaries and have been featured on The Project on Channel 10.  The Project went to the second LASS conference last weekend and filmed there as well but didn’t feature that footage in the package, but they did interview Dr Ramin Shayan of the University of Melbourne, Australia.  He is the group leader of the Lymphatic and Regenerative Surgery Group at the O’Brien Institute and his focus is surgery for lymphatic conditions, including Lipoedema.

I will be working on a post about Lipoedema news at the Asia Pacific Conference I attended a week and a half ago, including information from Dr Shayan’s presentations and will hopefully have that ready later today.

Here’s the link.  Have tissues handy!

 

http://ntpages.com.au/lisahiggins