Archives for posts with tag: swelling

Recently I was contacted by a local chiropractor after I treated one of his patients for swelling in her foot.  She’d had treatment from him, from a podiatrist and had been to see a foot specialist but after two sessions of Manual Lymphatic Drainage her condition had improved significantly.  He wanted to know more and to see if there were ways we could refer to each other to enhance our individual treatments.  We did a “body swap” – he gave me a chiropractic treatment and I have him a lymphatic treatment.  And he offered to write a guest blog for me on a subject we both deal with – sinus.  Here’s what he has to say about using chiropractic for sinus treatment.  And here’s a link to a post I wrote a while back about Manual Lymphatic Drainage for sinus (among other things).

Are You Having Sinus Troubles? – Dr Andrew Ullo (Chiropractor)

Do you wake up with a stuffy head and mucus in your throat? Do you have a headache behind the eyes? Do you suffer from cold like symptoms frequently? Then you may be suffering from sinusitis.

Your sinuses are eight hollow cavities in the bones of the forehead, cheeks and temples. Although they help you to breathe, they also prevent breathing sometimes, when they get inflamed and blocked with mucus.

Healthy, open sinuses are lined with mucus to help ensure that the air you take into your lungs is moist, warm and free from dust, dirt and other pollutants. Without this filter, the lungs, kidneys and blood can become permeated with toxins.

When the sinus lining is inflamed, swollen and full of mucus, the condition is called sinusitis. Sinusitis can commonly occur when you’ve had a cold and it clears up when the cold ends. However, if the drainage is blocked, pressure increases and can cause pain, discomfort, sinus headaches and swelling around your eyes, cheeks and ears. There are also some subtle signs of sinus difficulties, such as snoring, sore throat, coughing, sleep disturbances and a running nose.

How can Chiropractic care help with sinus issues?

Chiropractors understand the importance of a properly functioning nervous system and the mechanics of the body. So, decreasing the stress on the nervous system and removal of obstructions for the proper drainage of the sinuses, specifically in the neck and back, will help your body work more efficiently and allow the bodies fluids to drain without interference.

When you have restriction in your joints in your neck or cranial bones, you will find the muscles that attach to them to become stiff and the joints also become swollen and when these areas are restored from chiropractic adjustments, you can find it will dramatically assist with the recovery from the condition.

There are also specific chiropractic techniques designed to free up the sinus area from blockage. This generally involves a gentle massage of the nose, forehead and cheeks to release the pressure on the sinus cavities and allow the area to drain properly.

The other way that chiropractic can markedly help these problems is through increasing a person’s general health, and the strength of their nervous system. Evidently, when your body is in a better condition, it will have a stronger immune system and be able to fight infections and sicknesses more easily.

Consequently, if you get issues with your sinuses, whether it be sinusitis, regular colds, congestion or stuffiness, consult your Chiropractor or give the professionals at ABSOLUTE HEALTH SOLUTIONS a call today and see how they can help on 9948 2826.

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Three weeks ago I had a new client come to see me.  Denise is a 63-year-old woman who had a sore, bruised and swollen thigh.

Her upper leg started to swell on Christmas Day for no reason at all.  She had a large lump/bump laterally on her knee.  She was sent for various tests … an MRI, ultrasound, x-ray … all were clear.

Then, about ten days before coming to see me, Denise developed bruises down her thigh.  No injury.  No trauma of any kind.  Her doctor took a sample of fluid from the swelling on her knee and found that it was actually dried blood – that was tested and given the all clear.  The last injury she could remember on her leg was a “cork” she’d received over forty years before.   Her doctor thought that perhaps the blood came from that incident but there was no conclusive evidence.

She had not been able to weight-bear the week before coming to see me, her leg had been too swollen and painful.  Her knee was so painful it had stopped her from playing lawn bowls and she couldn’t bend it to go up and down stairs.  Lawn bowls is the only exercise she’s been able to get since she had back issues three years ago, when she spent three weeks in hospital and walked for six months with a stick.

Denise was given a referral to see a knee specialist after a scan showed a possible bone on bone scenario, the report basically said she needed to get a new knee, but her GP disagreed with that finding and felt she needed another opinion.  The specialist looked at her scans and agreed, her knees were fine and they were not the cause of her problems.

She has multiple health issues including a prior clot that had made its way to her lung and polycystic and multi cystic kidney disease.  But none of these could be responsible for her leg swelling.

What brought Denise to me was a segment on A Current Affair called “Neck Pain No More” which featured Low Level Laser treatment for a number of conditions.  She had called the business featured in the segment and her name and number was taken but they were so overwhelmed with enquiries, they said they’d call her back (they still haven’t).  Two weeks later she was in my clinic because she had done a google search and found that I had a Low Level Laser.  I’d post a link to the segment but when I tried to watch it online I could find the text but the video was incorrect (I have written to ACA to ask them to fix it, they are working on it).

So, here are some photos of Denise’s leg when she came to my clinic that first day.

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We decided to do some manual lymphatic drainage as well as laser and Denise wanted to work intensively, as she was going away for three months and wanted to feel better before she went.  The trip was in two weeks from the day she came to me.  That first day we did 15 minutes of laser and the rest was lymphatic drainage.  At the start her knee was painful when I touched it but by the end of the session her pain levels were down.

We did four treatments the first week and three the second, increasing the amount of laser to 25 minutes.  Each day the swelling and bruising reduced.  Most days she felt her walking improved but the bending was still restricted.

By the fourth treatment she felt she could get out of chairs easier.  At the fifth treatment the bruising was almost gone and the ladies at the bowling club had “diagnosed” her with bursitis.  She had gone home and googled the condition and felt it fit for her.  I must point out, this is not a medical diagnosis, it’s peer diagnosis. But she was happy with that.

By the last treatment she could get in and out of her car much easier and the bruising was gone and swelling was down.  She was a happy lady when she set off on her trip.

Here are some photos taken on her final treatment.

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Visit my website here for more information on the different techniques I use.

I want to introduce you to M.  He’s not my typical client, not that I really have those but you know what I mean.  Until May 2009 he was your typical (there’s that word again), active male, working hard and enjoying being outdoors and active.

He was up a ladder clearing out some guttering and he fell, landing on concrete, resulting in two months in a coma at Royal North Shore Hospital and then a few more months in recuperation at Ryde Hospital, until December.  Since then he’s been getting himself back – he’s had to learn to walk again and attends an exercise program called Walk On, three times a week.  He still walks with crutches but the Walk On guys have him walking short distances unaided – they work him HARD and he comes in with very sore muscles every week.  He sees physios and swims and is doing whatever possible to help himself.

M came to see me at the end of October last year because he had some swelling and pain in his lower leg for three weeks and after a clear Doppler his GP suggested some lymphatic drainage might help and sent him to see me.  That in itself is a minor miracle, a GP sending me a client, but I have to commend this particular GP, she’s sent me two clients recently – progress.

I did the usual upper body MLD clearing and focused on his left leg.  M was very sensitive to touch and had (and still has to a lesser degree) jerking responses, even when clearing his thigh his lower limb would be twitching, or sometimes his right leg.  I have to say that I did drop my lecturer a note about that and she assured me that this happens sometimes, it’s the increase in lymphatic flow making everything work a bit better and that includes nerves firing.  At the end of that first treatment he was amazed at the reduction in swelling.

He’s been coming regularly and we’ve added some laser to the treatment as the area around his lateral ankle is a bit firm and that has helped break down some of the fibrosis.  What we’ve been doing of late is adding ten minutes of remedial massage to his quads because he is worked so hard at Walk On that his muscles are sore.  Our treatments change according to what he needs on the day but it’s great to have a toolbox from which to choose.

Over the time we’ve had many discussions and I’m amazed by some of the things M still does, in spite of his limitations.  He related the story of being helped into the ocean while on holiday and a guy swimming out to him to tell him he shouldn’t swim because of the sharks – his response “I’m going to swim from one beach to the other and he should get out if he was worried about sharks”.  Well, the guy got out and M did his swim.

Or skiing again, using a special ski chair and going down so fast and doing such a sharp turn he broke one of the skis and had to get it repaired.  He’s given me some photos of him skiing with his instructor – pretty amazing huh.

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The moral of the story is, don’t be limited by what you think your body can and can’t do, anything’s possible.

I had a very different afternoon on Friday.  I pencilled it into the diary as “bra ladies” because that is exactly what it was, an afternoon of trying on bras.  And not your usual lingerie … post breast cancer surgery bras … post lumpectomy, post mastectomy or post reconstruction.  Post any of the above.

On 27th June 2012 I received an email from the organiser of the Cancer Support Group I attend (Active Women Touched by Cancer, Celebrating Life) saying she’d received an email from a lady called Tina who had cancer treatment and a mastectomy and reconstruction while in her 30s. Tina found that since the reconstruction she couldn’t find pretty and most importantly comfortable bras so she set about designing her own!   She was looking for women willing to talk about their experiences with finding comfortable bras to find out exactly what they liked or didn’t like about what was available, what they wanted to see, where they would buy them from, costings and all the relevant details.  I emailed Tina and said I’d be happy to be involved in any way possible as I knew lots of my ladies struggled to find comfortable bras that didn’t look like they were designed for your great-grandma.

We’ve had numerous email exchanges over the last year and a half.  Tina received her first prototype but was utterly disappointed with it and had to start again.  Bear in mind, this is a personal project, she has no backing or funding at this stage, so a setback like having to start all over was huge.

Here’s what Tina has to say:

Finding a company to produce the bras was a challenge.  The ‘journey’ (that word again) took me virtually via emails and Skype to Europe.  The European company understood my brief and vision.  What I love about working with the company is the beautiful attention to detail, quality, the European touch, the pride in the workmanship.  They have been an absolute pleasure to work with.  I also felt that having the bras made in an European country gave them that extra touch that I was seeking that China was unable to provide.

My design brief was to design lingerie that was European, sexy and fashionable.  The lingerie also had to accommodate the breast form securely and be comfortable to wear.  The pocket had to be in cotton.  Why?  Because most breast cancer treatment (not all) places the woman in menopause.  This means the woman experiences hot flushes and sweats and makes wearing a breast form in a bra with pocket polyester lining uncomfortable.  Cotton lining just seemed logical and it has the properties to absorb moisture and keep the wearer cool.

Which brings us to Friday afternoon.  We had five ladies in my clinic who had been through cancer, plus me. Tina brought along some examples of what was already available on the market for comparison and six designs of her own from two different producers.

The first person to try on had had a lumpectomy and had a “chicken fillet” insert to help fill out the affected side so she popped into the loo and came out to show us how it looked with her insert in.  She loved how it felt, particularly the cotton lining next to her skin – her current bra has a different lining which sometimes makes her feel a bit sticky and sweaty, so cotton was a nice touch.

The next lady who tried on had a double mastectomy and tram flap reconstruction seven months ago and nipple reconstruction a few weeks ago.  She had some swelling still in one breast.  She came out and modelled a different bra but had the same comments on comfort and design.  Great.

The third lady recently had lat dorsi reconstruction about three weeks prior and was also still swollen.  She hadn’t worn a bra in about five years because she couldn’t find any comfortable ones out there.  She had absolutely no inhibitions and whipped her top off and tried the bras on right there – again – in heaven.  She tried them nearly all of them on and was happy each time.

There wasn’t the right size for the fourth lady to try on but by that stage everyone was showing off their scars and ooohing and ahhhing at how good things looked – “wow, you can barely see the scars; wow, you’ve got nipples; wow, look how well you’re moving after such a short time”.  Nothing like a shared experience to bring people together.  I’m sure the laughter was heard for blocks!

We discussed how much everyone would be willing to pay for them – oh, did I mention she’s going to design undies to go along with the bras so you can have a beautiful matching set?  And where you’d buy them from.

Here’s a photo of the three winners of the day:

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Red Fern Lingerie, tina@redfernlingerie.com.au

If you’d like any more information or would like to try on the bras and give your opinion, please contact Tina Doueihi at tina@redfernlingerie.com.au or on 0407 359 751.  Her website http://www.redfernlingerie.com.au will be up and running soon.

A few years ago I lived in Dubai.  Not many people (outside of Dubai that is) are aware that Dubai is a bit of a Mecca for cosmetic surgery and injectables.  I worked at a “medical spa” while I was there – it was a essentially a beauty parlour, offering facials, wraps and hair treatments, but it was headed by a doctor who specialised in botox, fillers and slimming treatments.  At the time they didn’t offer any surgeries (they do now).

I often recount a story from my first day at work there – as I was coming down the stairs the doctor gently took my hand and asked me to come back upstairs with her.  Perplexed I said sure and then asked why.  She said “oh, I’m just going to put some filler in here and here and some botox here!”  I was a little taken aback and pointed out that I liked to do things naturally and that I didn’t even colour my hair.  She pulled me to the window and had a good look and said the hair just wouldn’t do and that natural is fine when you’re in your twenties but after that you need help!!!  Holy moley.  What do you say to that?  Well, I ran away as fast as I could and after two or three more attempts on her part I made a deal – I’d wear makeup to work every day and she had to stop asking (and I had a word with the owner of her business on the side too).  I tell the story to lay the background to the normality of cosmetic surgery in Dubai.

I sent letters to a few of the cosmetic surgeons to introduce myself.  Manual lymphatic pre and post cosmetic surgery speeds up healing and enhances the surgeon’s work so it’s a good fit.  I managed to meet a couple of the surgeons, one was very respected and had been in Dubai a long time and the other was newer to the area but he and his brother had pioneered vaser liposuction and so he was interesting as he had a slightly different approach.

I’m going to talk about my experience with the first surgeon.  He was very charismatic and of course looked great.  I went to his office and explained how my work could benefit his patients and he seemed interested.  A couple weeks later he called me to say he had just done a facelift and wanted to send the patient to me to “try me out”.  Sure I said.  He then asked me to do it for free which I refused – can you imagine?  Hello doctor, how about you give me a nose job for free so I can see if you’re any good.  Somehow I don’t think that would ever happen and I didn’t see why I should be expected to work for free.  He accepted that but I conceded that I’d do a reduction on the initial consult.  So he said he’d send her and “oh, I don’t want you to push fluid downwards, I’ve done too much work for you to ruin it”.  I tried to explain that there are no lymph collection vessels on the top of the head and if I directed fluid upwards she’d end up with fluid in wrong place, but there was no telling him. So I decided to just say I’d do it how wanted, but to actually follow the correct procedure with the patient.

In came the patient a couple days later.  She looked pretty good, clearly swollen and bruised but not too bad.  She hadn’t been allowed to wash her hair as yet so that was a bit gruesome.  And the first words out of her mouth?  “The doctor said to remind you to push the fluid upwards”.  Honestly.  He may be a great surgeon, but he knew nothing about the lymphatic system and his arrogance was doing my head in.

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photo courtesy google images, breastimplants.com.au

So I started the treatment, clearing the main nodes in her neck, armpits, chest, abdomen and groin area.  Then I went back and cleared her neck thoroughly so I could then start to send fluid DOWNWARDS to the nodes in her neck like I’m supposed to do.  So help me, by the time I finished clearing her neck she was sound asleep, almost snoring, so I was able to happily clear the fluid downwards to her neck without her interjecting about what the surgeon said.  She woke up at the end of the treatment and sat up and commented that some of the numbness had gone as well as some of the tightness from the swelling and she could move her face more.  She was thrilled.

The surgeon called me to say he was happy with how it went and would be ok with her coming for more treatments, but don’t forget … you guessed it “don’t push the fluid downwards”.  Agrhhhh!

He did send more patients to me thank goodness and I never did ‘fess up to him that I didn’t follow his instructions, but basically, in that instance, I knew better.

The moral of the story is, manual lymphatic drainage is beneficial after cosmetic surgery, helping to reduce swelling, bruising and numbness and of course helping to eliminate toxins from the anaesthetic and antibiotics.

 

Visit my website here for more information on the techniques I offer